OBS Studio on Raspberry Pi 4

Here is an extremely well documented guide on installing OBS Studio on your Raspberry Pi 4. I tried it and was successful in stalling. I even had the video driver error and was able to overcome it with “MESA_GL_VERSION_OVERRIDE=3.3 obs” as the guide suggested.

The only issue I found was that the icon under “Sound & Video” does not work. You have to type “MESA_GL_VERSION_OVERRIDE=3.3 obs” in a terminal for OBS Studio to work.

Alternately…you can install piKiss, which has an easy way to install OBS Studio. There’s a guide here. Once installed, navigate to “Multimedia”, and then “OBS”. With piKiss, you can also install many games, emulators, tweaks, multimedia programs and more. Very interesting program!

The MiSTer FPGA

If you are into various “retro” computer systems and video games, there’s a Hardware emulation platform using FPGA created by Terasic Technologies. An open source hardware add-on called MiSTer gives the FPGA hardware additional functionality, including an integrated USB hub, SDRAM, VGA video, analog out via headphone jack, and many other functions.
The board naively has an HDMI output and one USB port.

Specs:

  • 110K LEs; 5570 Kbits Embedded Memory; 6 PLLs; 2 Hard Memory Controllers
  • 800MHz Dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 Process; 1GB DDR3 SDRAM; 32-bit Data Bus
  • 1 Gibabit Ethernet PHY; USB Micro-AB Connect; Mirco SD Card Socket
  • Model Number : P0496
Terasic DE10-Nano Kit (comes pre-assembled)

Once you set it up, you can run computer systems from the early hobbyist computers like the Apple 1 to an IBM 486. You can also run a huge list of arcade games and video game consoles with no input lag. There are filters for scan-lines and video up-scaling for raster images. They are many other options as well, including game saves, input mapping, dip switch settings and more. Imagine the possibilities! Want more RAM for you Pet computer? There’s a setting for that! The best part is that you have a system that fits in the palm of your hand that can replace the hardware for hundreds of systems. It delivers with hardware accuracy, which will be an immediate improvement from software emulation in most cases.

There are three things you can buy that will compose the entire system. The FPGA motherboard, a micro SD card and the kit (I make no $ off these links):
Kit: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08ZC2NNW9?psc=1&ref=ppx_yo2_dt_b_product_details
Motherboard: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07B89YHSB?psc=1&ref=ppx_yo2_dt_b_product_details

Once you obtain the hardware, the next step is to flash the MiSTer software to a micro USB card:
https://github.com/MiSTer-devel/mr-fusion/releases
Balena Etcher is a perfect program to flash ISOs (and free).

Then obtain the “update-all” script, which will download all of hardware cores, computer bios files and arcade game roms:
https://github.com/theypsilon/Update_All_MiSTer

Once you flash the “mr-fusion” iso, you will need to run the SD card in the FPGA board. The system will set itself up.
Then place the “update-all” script in the scripts folder on the SD card.
Boot the system, hit ESC on your keyboard to get to option to run scripts. You will then run the wifi script to update your wifi settings. Then go back into the scripts option and run the “update-all” script. This will automatically install all your needed bios files, roms, and hardware cores.

After the wifi is setup and the “update-all” script run, your system will report the IP address when you hit the back button. With this IP, you can later SSH into it and add new games or virtual computer disks (example: d64 files for Commodore 64). Simply add the files under the “games” folder and into the appropriate system folder. Alternately, you can remove the SD card and mount it with your PC to add files.

Reference video:

DIY Atari 7800 Arcade Joystick

DIY Atari 2600/7800 Arcade Joystick

This is an unglamorous project with great results.

You will need: an old Atari 7800 Pro Controller, a Happ Controls Joystick and 2 Arcade buttons and some kind of project box.

This is the exact project box I used (I get nothing for linking this).
Most of the Happ Style joysticks and buttons are counterfeit but the ones at Microcenter are excellent.
Any of the top-rated 28MM hole saws will work. I used one from HSS. Looks like this:

uxcell 28mm HSS Drill Bit Hole Saw Cutter for Metal Alloy Wood
28MM DIA Hole Saw

I gutted a real Atari 7800 Pro Controller because most of the cables out there are for Atari 2600, so they are missing the second button wiring. You can get them cheap off of ebay. I believe since you are going to gut it for the wires and the resistors on the circuit board, cosmetics are beside the point. I saw some controllers on ebay in the $6-$8 range.

Atari 7800 Pro Line Joystick Controller OEM CX-24|NOT TESTED
Atari 7800 Pro Controller

Here’s what I did:
Put some masking tape on the top surface of the project box and using a sharpie, layout your controls, the middle hold and mounting holes of the joystick and the center-lines of the buttons.
Drill the joystick & button holes using the 28MM Dia hole saw. Then drill your screw holes. I think a 1/8″ drill will do it. Now peel off the masking tape and mount your controls.
Then you will take apart your Atari 7800 Pro Controller and carefully remove the wires from the circuit board. You might need to clip off the terminals from the Atari 7800 joystick and crimp better terminals. If you really don’t care what this thing looks like and you are brave, you could solder the wires right to the micro-switches. Who am I to judge? (Don’t do this.)

This is a wire map of the Atari 7800 Pro Controller:
Brown / Left
Green / Right
Blue / Down
White / Up
Button 1: Top Orange, Bottom Yellow & Resistor to Black
Button 2: Top Orange, Bottom Red & Resistor to Black

Using this wire map and the picture above, solder the wires and tape it up. The tricky part: you desolder the (2) 620 OHM resistors from the Atari 7800 Pro controller circuit board but you can can also buy new ones. These go between the ground wire and the ground terminal on the two buttons. You can clearly see this in the image above. Test it out and if you get it right, put the box together and ENJOY. Atari is much, much more fun with Arcade controls IMO.

Caveat: Before you drive yourself crazy like I did when testing: the difficulty switch on the front of the 7800 actually makes a difference with the 2 button games in some cases. For instance, when testing Xevious, both buttons launched missiles AND bombs simultaneously. I remembered that one should send a bomb and the other a missile. Well…”LEFT” difficulty does that. *slaps forehead* I ended up ripping the joystick apart driving myself crazy as to what went wrong when really nothing was wrong. UGH 😉

Pi-hole DNS Server

Vote For Your Favorite New Pi-hole Logo - Pi-hole®: A ...
Network-wide Ad Blocking

I have had a Pi-hole set up near my cable modem for at least 1-2 years now? Time moves differently for me for the last 18 months. Regardless, my Pi-hole device just sits there, filtering out ads from the network. I highly recommend setting up a Pi-hole for your home. It’s cheap, easy, effective and efficient!

What is it?
A cheap Raspberry Pi computer with an SD card. Gets power from a phone charger and connects with a simple Ethernet cable. Runs passively without any fans at about 37 degrees C.

How do you use it?
You can set it up as a Wifi source, or you can add the IP address in your wifi settings for DNS server. Use the same IP address in your web browser to see a web interface. From there you can modify the whitelist/blacklist and see in real time how many ads are being rejected.

Pi-Hole on Docker using OMV Raspberry Pi 4 "Network Wide ...

How do you set it up?
There are many guides. Here is a good one:
https://www.instructables.com/Pi-Hole-Setup-Guide/

Essentially, what is involved?
You flash a linux OS for Raspberry Pi onto your SD card using something like the Balena Etcher. I prefer “dietpi”, which is a low resource Debian distro.
https://dietpi.com/
A simple 8GB or higher card will suffice. Then you install Pi-hole on it.

How do you maintain it?
Every now and then, it’s good to log into it with SSH and run a “sudo apt update/upgrade” (if you choose a Debian distro). That’s it.

I have over 4 million domains on my blocklist and it makes a HUGE difference when I load websites without Pi-hole DNS configured in my wifi settings.

Bonus: You can SSH into it and install lynx, mc and any other useful linux terminal programs and have fun with it. As a double-bonus, you could even host web services like subsonic or ftp using it!

Setup a DIY Retro Gaming device with all of your favorite games

Using a Raspberry Pi, create a Retro Gaming device that can connect to a TV or computer monitor (HDMI or RCA).
Equipment needed:
*Raspberry Pi 3 B+ or Raspberry Pi 4 with Power Adapter
*Micro SD Card & Reader
*PC to setup the SD Card
*USB Keyboard
*HDMI Cable or 3.5MM Video AV Component Adapter

Install Brave Browser in Debian-based system like Ubuntu

How Does Brave Browser on Windows Compare?

Brave is a great privacy-focused browser with built-in (optional) crypto functionality. It blocks trackers and ads without an extension and it’s the only browser I know of that blocks Youtube ads. Very useful!

There’s only an X86 version as of now, so it will not work with Raspberry Pi yet. I am running it on my work iphone and my de-googled android.

sudo apt install apt-transport-https curl gnupg

curl -s https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/brave-core.asc | sudo apt-key --keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/brave-browser-release.gpg add -

echo "deb [arch=amd64] https://brave-browser-apt-release.s3.brave.com/ stable main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/brave-browser-release.list

sudo apt update

sudo apt install brave-browser

Migrate from Windows to Ubuntu with 3 lines in a terminal

You can obviously tailor this list to your needs, but with this post you can install at once these programs in a Debian-based distribution (x86 or Raspberry Pi!):
FTP, audio editor/streamer/player/tagger, office suite, radio streamer, remote desktop client, video editor, web browser, social media, disc utility, bit torrent client, email client, virtual machine, photo editor, CAD, CD burner, comic/ebook reader

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

sudo apt install filezilla audacity vlc rhythmbox thunderbird lynx mc krita libreoffice brasero gparted picard freecad transmission remmina obs-studio kid3-qt sound-juicer snapd p7zip-full p7zip-rar

Raspberry Pi has an ARM processor, so a few of these programs are unavailable. OBS Studio can be installed with this guide. Use this command instead:
sudo apt install filezilla audacity vlc rhythmbox thunderbird lynx mc libreoffice brasero gparted picard freecad transmission remmina kid3-qt sound-juicer snapd p7zip-full

(Reboot before you install anything with 'snap'):
sudo snap install freac foliate telegram-desktop

At the end of the page is an explanation of which programs do what.
Note: Every program on this list works on almost any Debian-based Raspberry Pi distribution, including Kali, Ubuntu Mate, Ubuntu Desktop, Raspberry PI OS

Raspberry Pi only: Tip for games and tweaks
There’s a CLI program called pi-kiss that can install multiple games, emulators, system configurations, tweaks, tools, scripts, etc.

curl -sSL https://git.io/JfAPE | bash

Launch the program:
cd /root/piKiss
./piKiss.sh

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